Busy in July

As we get into the middle of our summer season, we have lots coming up in the next couple of weeks.

  • Saturday July 18 at noon is our regular monthly meeting at the New Hong Kong Buffet.
  • Sunday July 19 at 8:00 a.m. we’ll gather at Shooter’s Tavern for a hearty breakfast prior to launching our litter pickup on RT 3.
  • Friday July 24, early arrivals for Beach Day can catch the fireworks show at Weirs Beach.
  • Saturday July 25 is packed with Beach Day events:
    • LRP Beach Day Sunrise Photo Shoot 5:15 a.m.
    • LRP Beach Day Cookout 12:00-3:00 at Weirs Beach
    • LRP Beach Day Skee Ball Tournament at Funspot 5:00 p.m.
    • LRP Beach Day Southbound Thirst Quencher at Area 23

Much info available on Facebook or comment here to get questions answered.

Gov. Hassan: You’ve Got Mail

A message for the Governor.In coming days Gov. Hassan will be seeing a lot of orange (at least her staff will). The New Hampshire Firearms Coalition is behind an effort to see to it that the Governor sign SB 116, a bill which allows the discreet carry of a firearm without a license.

Under the current licensing scheme a person can be denied a license if they are not deemed to be a ‘suitable person’. If you don’t stop to consider the term ‘suitable person’, you might think, that’s not a problem. Once you know where the term came from and how it was, and still is used, you will see the problem. Back in the 1920’s and 30’s there were a lot of immigrants coming to America from Ireland and Italy and they were deemed to be unsuitable. You can be sure that this suitability test was applied to other groups as well.

Currently, anyone who is not prohibited from owning a firearm (felons) may carry openly; this is a discriminatory policy. Openly carrying for women is much less socially unacceptable than for men. Furthermore, it is much more dangerous for a woman to carry openly compared to a man; if a criminal were of a mind to attempt to take a gun from a person, he would choose a target which seemed to be easier to overcome with force.

For those who stand on principle and refuse to seek permission to carry, open carry is the only legal option. Without SB 116 women are put at higher risk than men.

If the Governor supports equality, she needs to show it and put an end to this discriminatory licensing scheme.

You can contact the Governor here, or call her 603 271 2121. Ask her to stand up for women’s rights and end discrimination by signing SB 116.

New Hampshire Set To Ban Poppy Seeds

The New Hampshire house passed on Wednesday, May 6, 2015, a bill restricting the sale or possession of synthetic drugs. The intent of the bill is to extend the ‘war on drugs’ to assorted synthetic mimics of cannabis such as ‘spice’.

While we can have a debate over the efficacy of prohibition, there is no question that we have a flawed system of reviewing legislation. This bill, SB 106, defines ‘synthetic drug’ by describing a long (11 pages found below) and complex list of chemical compounds. This bill was reviewed by the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee. It is an open question as to this committee’s expertise to evaluate complex chemistry. In an attempt to determine what this definition of ‘synthetic drug’ might include a pharmacist was asked for their opinion. In reply the pharmacist said “The chemistry mentioned is over my head.

Many natural and herbal products, and nutritional  supplements may contain molecules which are captured in the definition of  ‘synthetic drug’. One common item that is very likely to become a ‘synthetic drug’ is poppy seeds. According to Snopes, it is true: Indeed, something as innocuous as the poppy seeds on a bagel or muffin or in a slice of cake can make the drug-free look like heroin users.

State Representative Ed Comeau warns, “It attempts to create a mechanism whereby an infinitely expansive list will be created. If the banned chemicals are found in products sold to the public, a store owner will be fined.”

It is irresponsible for the house to pass a bill for which committee members are unqualified and received little testimony on such a highly technical and important detail. How this bill might effect the sale of many very useful natural and herbal products was given little to no consideration in the zeal to expand the war on people with substance abuse problems. As long as we continue to disregard the root cause of substance abuse, we will continue to hack at the symptoms and never ease the suffering.

For your convenience, the definition:

IV. “Synthetic drug” means any substance within the following structural classes:

(a) Any compound containing a 2-(3-hydroxycyclohexyl)phenol structure with a substituent at the 5-position of the phenolic ring: whether or not substituted on the cyclohexyl ring to any extent.

(b) Any compound containing a 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)indene ring system with a substituent at the 3-position of the indene ring system: whether or not further substituted on the indene ring to any extent, and whether or not substituted on the naphthyl ring to any extent.

(c) Any compound containing an indole ring system with a substituent on the nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 3-position of the indole ring system, with a linkage connecting the ring system to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the indole ring system to the substituent at its 3-position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 3-position of the indole ring system is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Allcylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylopropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 3-position of the indole ring system, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the indole ring system to any extent.

(d) Any compound containing an indazole ring system with a substituent at the 1-position nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 3-position of the indazole ring system, with a linkage connecting the ring system to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the indazole ring system to the substituent at its 3-position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 3-position of the indazole ring system is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylopropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 3-position of the indazole ring system, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the indazole ring system to any extent.

(e) Any compound containing a pyrrole ring with a substituent on the nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 3-position of the pyrrole ring, with a linkage connecting the ring to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the pyrrole ring to the substituent at its 3-position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 3-position of the pyrrole ring is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylopropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 3-position of the pyrrole ring, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the pyrrole ring to any extent.

(f) Any compound containing a pyrazole ring with a substituent at the 1-position nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 3-position of the pyrazole ring with a linkage connecting the ring to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the pyrazole ring to the substituent at its 3-position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 3-position of the pyrazole ring is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl.

(F) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, or biphenyl).

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylopropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 3-position of the pyrazole ring, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the pyrazole ring to any extent.

(g) Any compound containing a pyrazole ring with a substituent at the 1-position nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 3-position of the pyrazole ring with a

linkage connecting the ring to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the pyrazole ring to the substituent at its 3 position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 3 position of the pyrazole ring is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylpropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 3 position of the pyrazole ring, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the pyrazole ring to any extent.

(h) Any compound containing a naphthalene ring system with a substituent on the 1 position carbon atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 4 position of the naphthalene ring system, with a linkage connecting the ring system to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the naphthalene ring system to the substituent at its 4 position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 4 position of the naphthalene ring system is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylpropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 4 position of the naphthalene ring system, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the naphthalene ring system to any extent.

(i) Any compound containing a carbazole ring system with a substituent on the nitrogen atom and bearing an additional substituent at the 1, 2, or 3 position of the carbazole ring system, with a linkage connecting the ring system to the substituent:

(1) Where the linkage connecting the carbazole ring system to the substituent at its 1, 2, or 3 position is any of the following:

(A) Alkyl.

(B) Carbonyl.

(C) Ester.

(D) Thione.

(E) Thioester.

(F) Amino.

(G) Alkylamino.

(H) Amido.

(I) Alkylamido.

(2) Where the substituent at the 1, 2, or 3 position of the carbazole ring system is, disregarding the linkage, any of the following groups:

(A) Naphthyl.

(B) Quinolinyl.

(C) Adamantyl.

(D) Phenyl.

(E) Cycloalkyl (limited to cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, or cyclohexyl).

(F) Biphenyl.

(G) Alkylamido (limited to ethylamido, propylamido, butanamido, or pentanamido).

(H) Benzyl.

(I) Carboxylic acid.

(J) Ester.

(K) Ether.

(L) Phenylpropylamido.

(M) Phenylpropylamino.

(3) Whether or not the substituent at the 1, 2, or 3 position of the carbazole ring system, disregarding the linkage, is further substituted to any extent.

(4) Whether or not further substituted on the carbazole ring system to any extent.

(j) Any substance which includes, but is not limited to the following:

(1) QUCHIC/BB-22.

(2) STS-135.

(3) APICA/SDB-001.

(4) ADBICA.

(5) ADB-FUBINACA.

(6) AB-001.

(7) SDB-006.

(8) EG-018.

(9) CB-13.

(10) 5-chloro-UR-144.

(11) FUB-PB-22.

(k) Any synthetic cathinone, which shall be defined as any of the following chemical structures, their salts, isomers and salts of isomers, whenever the existence of these is possible within the specific chemical designation, including any compound structurally derived from 2-aminopropanal by substitution at the 1-position with a monocyclic or fused polycyclic ring system, including compounds further modified by:

(1) Substitution on the ring system to any extent (including, but not limited to alkyl, alkoxy, alkylenedioxy, haloalkyl, or halide substituents), whether or not further substituted in the ring system by other substituents; and/or

(2) Substitution at the 3-position with a saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon substituent; and/or

(3) Mono- or di- substitution at the 2-amino nitrogen atom with saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, or inclusion of the 2-amino nitrogen atom in a cyclic structure, whether or not that cyclic structure contains any further substitutions;

(4) Includes, but is not limited to:

(A) 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone (3,4-DMMC)

(B) Beta-keto-ethylbenzodioxolylbutanamine (eutylone)

(C) 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylcathinone (ethylone)

(5) 4-methoxymethcathinone (methedrone) This term shall not include substances that are otherwise scheduled under the Controlled Substances Act: (e.g. cathinone, methcathinone, methylone, mephedrone, MDPV, diethylpropion, pyrovalerone), are FDA-approved pharmaceutical products (i.e. bupropion) or are FDA-approved research products.

(l) Any synthetic psychoactive compound or substance which shall be defined as substances and their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers, wherever the existence of these is possible, within the following specific chemical designation:

(1) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25D-NBOMe).

(2) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25E-NBOMe).

(3) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-nitro-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25N-NBOMe).

(4) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-n-propyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25P-NBOMe).

(5) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylthio-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25T2-NBOMe).

(6) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-sec-propylthio-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25T4-NBOMe).

(7) 2,5-dimethoxy-4-n-propylthio-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)phenethylamine (also known as 25T7-NBOMe).

(8) N-(2-methoxybenzyl)-3,4-dimethoxyamphetamine (also known as 34-DMA NBOMe).

(9) 1-(1-Benzofuran-2-yl)propan-2-amine (also known as 2-APB).

(10) 5-(2-aminopropyl)-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran (also known as 5-APDB).

(11) 2-(2-ethylaminopropyl)benzofuran (also known as 2-EAPB).

(12) 1-(Benzofuran-5-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine (also known as 5-MAPB).

(13) 3,4-dichloromethylphenidate.

(14) 5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindan (also known as 5,6-MDAI).

(15) 4-hydroxy-diethyltryptamine (also known as 4-hydroxy-DET).

(16) 4-methoxyphencyclidine (also known as 4-methoxy-PCP or methoxydine).

(17) 3,4-dichloro-N-([1-(dimethylamino)cyclohexyl]methyl)benzamide (also known as AH-7921).

(18) Benocyclidine (also known as BTCP).

(19) Methoxetamine (also known as MXE).

(20) 3-Methyl-6-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine (also known as CL218872).

(21) 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl)piperidine (also known as diphenidine).

(22) 1-Cyclohexyl-4-(1,2-diphenylethyl)piperazine (also known as MT-45).

(23) (3-diethylamino-2,2-dimethylpropyl)-4-nitrobenzoate (also known as nitrocaine or nitracaine).

(24) (E)-4-chloro-N-1(phenylethylpiperidin-2-ylidene)sulfonamide (also known as W-15).

(25) (E)-4-chloro-N-(1-(4-nitrophenylethyl)piperidin-2-ylidene)sulfonamide (also known as W-18).

(26) 4-fluoroamphetamine.

(27) 1-(thiophen-2-yl)-2-methylaminopropane (also known as methiopropamine).

(m) This definition shall not include:

(1) Endocannabinoids that are naturally found in the human body;

(2) Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or other marijuana-derived cannabinoids, in the form of marinol, dronabinol, or another generic pharmaceutical equivalent, provided the medication has been issued as the result of a valid prescription; or

(3) Any other drugs that have cannabinoid receptor activity that are currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for medical use; or marijuana and extracts of marijuana authorized for therapeutic use pursuant to RSA 126-X.

359-O:3 Prohibited Activities. No person or business shall sell, barter, give, publicly display for sale or attempt to sell, or to possess or transport, any material, compound, mixture, or preparation which contains any quantity of a synthetic drug or its optical, positional, and geometric isomers, salts, and salts of isomers, whenever the existence of such isomers, salts, and salts of isomers is possible within the specific chemical designation as defined in this chapter.

359-O:4 Exceptions. It shall not be an offense under this chapter if the person or business was acting at the direction of federal, state, or local law enforcement officers to enforce or ensure compliance with this chapter prohibiting the sale of the substances listed in RSA 359-O:2.

Honor Your Mother

Mother’s Day is Sunday May 10. There are lots of ways to show your love of your mother. We will be doing one of our roadside clean-ups along RT 3 in Belmont. Cleaning up mother earth will certainly make your mom proud.

We will gather at Shooter’s (RT 3 Belmont just south of the Belknap Mall) for breakfast an 8:00 and the hit the road for our spring cleaning. Come on along and show your mother some love.

Gilford's State Rep joined us for the clean-up.
Gilford’s State Rep joined us for the clean-up.

LibertySpot 2015

You know there is liberty to be found here.
You know there is liberty to be found here.

Have you ever thought about what it’d be like to invite the entire NH liberty movement to Funspot – the largest arcade in the world – and play video games, indoor mini golf, bowl, darts, pool, bingo, drink, eat and have fun for hours? Let’s do this!

Mark your calendar April 18, 2015! We’ll start with our regular Lakes Region Porcupines meeting at the New Hong Kong Buffet at noon and then move on to Funspot from 2:00 until 11:45!

It turns out, the founder/owner of Funspot, 84-year old Bob Lawton, is a big fan of liberty and his favorite book is Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged! When Funspot turned on their new digital sign in the 1980’s, the first message Bob put on it was “Who is John Galt?” Did you know Bob was the State Rep who sponsored the bill to put “Live Free or Die” on our license plates?

To make this day even more epic, everybody’s encouraged to wear their favorite liberty gear! Wear an FSP tshirt, an NHLA polo, a Mises bracelet, a Ron Paul hat, a gun rights tshirt, whatever you want! You’ll be surrounded by fans of liberty!

Plus, we’ll have a special table with some coupons:

$20 for 125 arcade tokens
$10 large cheese pizza
$11 large pepperoni pizza
$2.50/game on the new indoor mini golf course
$4/game of bowling

Bingo starts at 6:45pm in the building next door to Funspot. The D.A. Long Tavern, the bar inside Funspot, opens at 1pm on Saturday (only ages 21 and up can enter the Tavern and drinks must stay in the Tavern).

Come out and have fun with other NH liberty activists! Join and share our event! See ya there!

Thank you Vince Perfetto (101 Reasons Film) for creating a great day of fun!